Thursday, February 27, 2014

The body of work showing in the Confluentés Sea emerged out of an engagement 
with the senses of touch, the haptic and 'smooth space'. Touch is the most tangible 
of our senses. We rely on it to calibrate what we see and hear. Despite this an 
exorbitant privileging of sight has developed within Western thought and knowledge 
that has "actively forgotten and deliberately written touch out of our cultural history". 
This exhibition introduces a major body of work by Tim Mosely that initiates 
a re/membering of touch. It is the first in a series of three exhibitions that presents 
artwork he has produced during his PhD candidature.

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

   how deep this touch
Beneath the Surface
 Gallery 105, Crane Arts, Piladelphia, 2014,
 & supported by the Griffith University Centre for Creative Arts Research

    a haptic touch of the rainforest
    quadriptych / relief prints on awagami kozo
    280 x 90 cm

This series of works showing at Crane Arts, Philadelphia, is a part of a larger body of work titled re/membering touch that investigates the role of touch in the reception and evaluation of art. The artists book from the deep requires an intimate response from the viewer. To read this book they must touch the image, and this touch offers a sensibility that is not available through sight. The prints in the show were made with multiple layers of printing that builds up a rich textured surface both literally and figuratively. Viewed from a distance they soon draw the viewer into an intimate space where the textures come into play.   

      Kanage pholu  - a  &  Kanage pholu  - b                                                   
     diptychs / relief prints on awagami kozo,     140 x 90 cm                


    from the deep
    artists book / relief prints on awagami kozo, rainforest ply
    65 x 32 cm (open)